A Cosmopolitan Job Search



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With increased globalization and cosmopolitan approaches to life, the job hunting process is also undergoing changes. People are increasingly looking for jobs outside the borders or their countries, in various fields regardless of their education, and in a more competitive world then ever. While the companies from developed countries are struggling to hire the most qualified work force, it is becoming more likely that this work force will be coming from countries in transition or developing states. As an example, Eastern Europe was able to supply the EU labor market with increased numbers of highly educated professionals who were willing to work for less.

When you are looking for a job, and you care less about the country this job will take you to, but you are more concerned about you role in the job, it is important to take the following into consideration:

Particularities of job search approaches
When looking for jobs outside any state borders, we cannot assume that the job search process is the same worldwide. While the overall process may be the same, there are certain things that are done differently. In some countries it is important that you call the employer to discuss the job before applying, while in others you are discouraged from contacting the employer. These are details you should be aware of so that you can have a successful application process. It might be best for you to:
- Contact people who work in the country of application (even if it is on a forum and you don't personally know the people you are addressing) and talk to them about the recruitment process they went through;
- Take a look at a few resumes of people who work in the country of destination and check if your resume follows a similar pattern (at the same time don't try too hard to make yourself blend, differences can be positive in bringing your resume forward in front of an employer);
- Learn more about the culture of the country you seek employment in and incorporate this knowledge in your job search strategy and decision making.

Cultural differences
Being cosmopolitan in your job search does not mean you have to be ignorant of culture and life outside the borders of your country, or assume that everything is the same everywhere. The world is very diverse, and you are cosmopolitan when you learn to embrace the differences and respect various cultures. Before you apply for a job in another country - take a few hours time to learn more about the country, the people, and the culture of that place. Knowledge of the culture will help you prepare a resume and a job search strategy that will generate results. This process will also help you decide if you would really be happy in that country. When you want to have a life outside the office, this becomes even more important. As an example, I know a job seeker from the US who decided to move to a company in the UK, and without making any research assumed that London would be the same as Los Angeles. It does not quite work this way.

Honesty and integrity
Applying for a job thousands of miles away does not mean that the employer or recruiter will never check your background. Make sure that in your application you provide only verifiable information, and that you can support the provided data with more details during the interview. Also, make sure you can undertake legal employment in that country, and do not forge any documents that will help you get that job. It is not only dishonest - it is also not worth it.

The world is a very small yet diverse place, and every culture has a certain impact on the overall life and job-hunting process of its people. If you are looking to apply for a job outside the boundaries of your country, make sure you understand what you are getting yourself into. This will help your put together a successful job search strategy. I understand that this is complicated when you are looking at 10 or more countries at the same time, but who said life of a cosmopolitan careerist is easy.

Author Bio
Rachel Gordon is a recruitment consultant at www.MasterEmployment.com. She can be contacted by e-mail at info-at-masteremployment.com. You are welcome to re-post this article as long as you keep the information about the author intact, including the links. Contact MasterEmployment.com for more details.

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